Difference between revisions of "Underground Railroad"

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*"Anti-Slavery Movement and the Underground Railroad in Andover & Greater Lawrence, Massachusetts"
 
*"Anti-Slavery Movement and the Underground Railroad in Andover & Greater Lawrence, Massachusetts"
 
*"Antislavery Movement was Active in Andover," Andover Townsman, June 20, 1996, p.20
 
*"Antislavery Movement was Active in Andover," Andover Townsman, June 20, 1996, p.20
[[Image:nextry.jpg|thumb|left|"Antislavery Movement was Active in Andover" ''Andover Townsman'', June 20, 1996 page 20....click to enlarge]]
 
  
 
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Revision as of 19:12, 22 January 2008

Because many in the community were dedicated to the anti-slavery movement the Underground Railroad had several stops in the homes of Andover.

Andover Homes:

  • William Jenkins – 8 Douglass St (formerly Jenkins Road)
    • "The William Jenkins House," The Townswoman's Andover by Bessie Goldsmith (974.45 Gol), p. 20
    • "Andover’s Home was but one Stop on the Undergroud Railroad," Andover Townsman 10/26/2000 (This article is found in the Andover Vertical File under Underground Railroad)
    • “Andover:Symbol of New England” by Claude Fuess, (974.45 Fuess), p. 314
    • "Jenkins House Station for Escaping Slaves," Andvoer Townsman, March 22, 1956 (This Article can be found in the Jenkins Family File
  • Holt Cogswell House – 373 South Main St.
  • Mark Newman House – 210 Main St. on the Phillips Academy Campus
  • Stowe House – 80 Bartlett St.
  • William Poor and Sons Wagon Factory - 66 Poor St.
    • William Poor and his sons built carriages with false bottoms for transporting slaves to freedom.
  • Free Christian Church – 31 Elm St.


See


Andover Verticle File - Underground Railroad contains many newspaper articles and other materials written about the role of Andover in rescuing slaves in the 1800s.




--Eleanor 16:06, January 16, 2008 (EST)

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