Difference between pages "Andover Biography - Abraham Marland" and "Andover Author - Harriet Beecher Stowe"

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m (New page: Abraham Marland, born in Ashton Lancashire in 1772, was one of the founders of the textile industry in New England. He apprenticed in Lancashire and then emigrated to America in 1801, wor...)
 
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Abraham Marland, born in Ashton Lancashire in 1772, was one of the founders of the textile industry in New England.  He apprenticed in Lancashire and then emigrated to America in 1801, working first in the cotton mills in Byfield.  He eventually settled in Andover because of the water power manufacturing cotton first and changing to wool. During the War of 1812 his company manufactured blankets for the army. After the war he began to manufacture woolens and leased land on the Shawsheen River and erected a brick mill and tenement houses. By 1832 after aquiring more and more land on the Shawsheen River, he built the Marland Manufacturing Company. Marland Manufacturing Company was sold to Moses T. Stevens of North Andover in July of 1870.  Stevens continued to produce flannel and woolens.
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Harriet Beecher Stowe lived in Andover from 1852 to 1864 while her husband Calvin E. Stowe was a professor at the Andover Theological Seminary. Originally, the Stowe house was located on the property of the seminary. It was moved to 80 Bartlet Street in 1929 when Phillips Academy decided to replace the house.
  
He founded Christ Church donating the land and building a rectory in 1835.
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Stowe's famous anti-slavery novel, ''Uncle Tom's Cabin'', was first published in serial form before she moved to Andover. The book was published in 1852, while she lived in Andover.  3,000 copies sold the first day and 300,000 copies sold in the United States the first year, yielding her $10,000 in royalties.  
  
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A little known fact is that she introduced the Christmas Tree to Andover.
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Although she was born and died in Connecticut, she and her husband are buried in the Chapel Cemetery at Phillips Academy.
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[[Image:Phillips_Inn_&_Harriet_Beecher_Stowe_House.jpg|thumb|...''Phillips Inn & Harriet Beecher Stowe House''.... click to enlarge|left]]
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[[Image:Stowe_House.jpg|thumb|...''The Harriet Beecher Stowe House''.... click to enlarge|left]]
  
 
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--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 16:05, December 26, 2012 (EST)
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* [http://andover.mvlc.org/eg/opac/record/639225?fi%3Aitem_type=a;query=stowe%20harriet%20beecher;qtype=author;locg=5 ''The Pearl Of Orr's Island'']
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[http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=553022&t=key%20to%20uncle%20tom's%20cabin&tp=title&l=5&d=0&f=at&hc=1&rt=title ''A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin''.]   by Harriet Beecher Stowe  (Andover Room R 326 Sto)
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[http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=553091&t=life%20harriet%20beecher%20stowe%20compiled&tp=keyword&l=5&d=0&hc=1&rt=keyword ''Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe: Compiled from Her Letters and Journals''], by Charles Edward Stowe. (Andover Room R B Stowe, Ha.)
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[http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=487303&t=Andover%20a%20Century%20of%20Change&tp=keyword&l=5&d=0&hc=2&rt=keyword ''Andover a Century of Change: 1896 - 1996''], by Eleanor Motley Richardson, (974.45 Ric), page 18, 19, 35, 47.
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[http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/moa/pageviewer?frames=1&coll=moa&view=50&root=%2Fmoa%2Fnewe%2Fnewe0021%2F&tif=00011.TIF&cite=http%3A%2F%2Fcdl.library.cornell.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fmoa%2Fmoa-cgi%3Fnotisid%3DAFJ3026-0021-3 "Harriet Beecher Stowe,"] by George Willis Cooke, ''The New England Magazine'', September 1896 (new series), page 3 - 18 
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*"Harriet Beecher Stowe," ''Andover Townsman,'' July 3, 1896, p.4 (death)
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*"Burial of Mrs. Stowe," ''Andover Townsman,'' July 10, 1896
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*"Stowe's Fame Lives on 100 Years After Death," ''Eagle Tribune'', July 3, 1996, page 1 and page 18.
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*Andover File under Authors, Biography, and Cemeteries
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--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 15:45, August 15, 2007 (EDT)<br>
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--[[User:Kim|Kim]] 10:04, November 30, 2011 (EST)
 
back to [[Main Page|Main Page]]
 
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[[Category:Andover Answers Index]]
 
[[Category:Andover Answers Index]]

Revision as of 17:37, 2 January 2013

Harriet Beecher Stowe lived in Andover from 1852 to 1864 while her husband Calvin E. Stowe was a professor at the Andover Theological Seminary. Originally, the Stowe house was located on the property of the seminary. It was moved to 80 Bartlet Street in 1929 when Phillips Academy decided to replace the house.

Stowe's famous anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published in serial form before she moved to Andover. The book was published in 1852, while she lived in Andover. 3,000 copies sold the first day and 300,000 copies sold in the United States the first year, yielding her $10,000 in royalties.

A little known fact is that she introduced the Christmas Tree to Andover.

Although she was born and died in Connecticut, she and her husband are buried in the Chapel Cemetery at Phillips Academy.

...Phillips Inn & Harriet Beecher Stowe House.... click to enlarge
...The Harriet Beecher Stowe House.... click to enlarge


A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. by Harriet Beecher Stowe (Andover Room R 326 Sto)

Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe: Compiled from Her Letters and Journals, by Charles Edward Stowe. (Andover Room R B Stowe, Ha.)

Andover a Century of Change: 1896 - 1996, by Eleanor Motley Richardson, (974.45 Ric), page 18, 19, 35, 47.

"Harriet Beecher Stowe," by George Willis Cooke, The New England Magazine, September 1896 (new series), page 3 - 18

  • "Harriet Beecher Stowe," Andover Townsman, July 3, 1896, p.4 (death)
  • "Burial of Mrs. Stowe," Andover Townsman, July 10, 1896
  • "Stowe's Fame Lives on 100 Years After Death," Eagle Tribune, July 3, 1996, page 1 and page 18.
  • Andover File under Authors, Biography, and Cemeteries


--Eleanor 15:45, August 15, 2007 (EDT)
--Kim 10:04, November 30, 2011 (EST) back to Main Page