Difference between pages "Telephone" and "Andover Teacher's Seminary"

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In the late 1880's Moses Stevens connected the Marland Mills - one in Andover, one in Haverhill, and one in North Andover - by telephone.  This was the first telephone in Andover. Moses Stevens had bought Marland Mills from Abraham Marland in 1879.
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The Andover Teacher's Seminary was established using an unrestricted bequest from William Phillips II. A progressive institution for it's time, it was only the second teacher training program in the United States. It featured  chemistry and physics laboratories and a library of 805 volumes.  
  
In the 1958 dial telephones came to Andover.  The first exchange was Greenleaf (475).  Andover originally had a 617 area code.  It was first changed to 508 and finally to 978 in 1977.
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Samuel Read Hall, the first principal, is credited with developing respected educational philosophies, as well as inventing the first blackboard and eraser.
  
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Frederick Law Olmstead was a student here.
  
[[File:Telephone.jpg|200px|thumb|left|Page from the 1904 Andover telephone directory.]] from the Andover Townsman Centennial Issue, July 21, 1933
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Due to lack of continuing funding the school closed its doors in 1842.
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[[Image:andoverteachers.jpg|200px|thumb|left|Andover Teacher's Seminary.]]
  
See
 
* [http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=103693&t=historical%20sketches%20of%20andover&tp=title&d=0&hc=7&rt=title ''Historical Sketches of Andover''] by Sarah Loring Bailey, (974.45 Bai), p.590
 
* [http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=487303&t=andover%20a%20century%20of%20change&tp=keyword&d=0&hc=2&rt=keyword''Andover a Century of Change:1896 - 1996''] by Eleanor Motley Richardson, (974.45 Ric), pages 84 and 147.
 
* "Area Code Changing Again", ''The Townsman'', July 24, 1997.
 
 
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See <br>
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*"The preacher behind Andover Teachers Seminar," ''Andover Townsman'', April 9, 2015, p. 15.
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*"Andover Teachers Seminary: A Short-Lived Lesson Ahead of its Time. Andover Townsman, March 2, 2015, page 19.
  
  
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--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 16:27, November 17, 2009 (EST)\
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--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] ([[User talk:Eleanor|talk]]) 14:33, 12 February 2016 (EST)
  
--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] ([[User talk:Eleanor|talk]]) 13:41, 22 October 2015 (EDT)
 
 
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[[Category:Andover Answers Index]]
 
[[Category:Andover Answers Index]]

Latest revision as of 16:10, 12 February 2016

The Andover Teacher's Seminary was established using an unrestricted bequest from William Phillips II. A progressive institution for it's time, it was only the second teacher training program in the United States. It featured chemistry and physics laboratories and a library of 805 volumes.

Samuel Read Hall, the first principal, is credited with developing respected educational philosophies, as well as inventing the first blackboard and eraser.

Frederick Law Olmstead was a student here.

Due to lack of continuing funding the school closed its doors in 1842.


Andover Teacher's Seminary.


See

  • "The preacher behind Andover Teachers Seminar," Andover Townsman, April 9, 2015, p. 15.
  • "Andover Teachers Seminary: A Short-Lived Lesson Ahead of its Time. Andover Townsman, March 2, 2015, page 19.



--Eleanor (talk) 14:33, 12 February 2016 (EST)

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