Difference between revisions of "Gypsy Moths"

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In 1981 the town sprayed with BT (Bacillus Thuringiensis) to combat the huge influx of the catepillars that covered the trees and houses.  In 1981, gypsy moths defoliated a record 12.9 million acres.  Gypsy moths are native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. They were brought to America in 1869 by a French naturalist trying to breed them with silkworms. Some of the larvae escaped during his experiments in Medford, MA.
In 1981 the town sprayed with BT (Bacillus Thuringiensis) to combat the huge influx of the catepillars that covered the trees and houses.  That year gypsy moths defoliated a record 12.9 million acres.  Gypsy moths are native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. They were brought to America in 1869 by a French naturalist trying to breed them with silkworms. Some of the larvae escaped during his experiments in Medford, MA.
 
Town annual reports, 1979-1984.


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--[[User:Glenda|Glenda]] 15:28, October 2, 2006 (EDT)<!-- insert signature here, if desired -->
--[[User:Glenda|Glenda]] 15:28, October 2, 2006 (EDT)<!-- insert signature here, if desired -->

Revision as of 15:29, 2 October 2006

In 1981 the town sprayed with BT (Bacillus Thuringiensis) to combat the huge influx of the catepillars that covered the trees and houses. That year gypsy moths defoliated a record 12.9 million acres. Gypsy moths are native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. They were brought to America in 1869 by a French naturalist trying to breed them with silkworms. Some of the larvae escaped during his experiments in Medford, MA.

Town annual reports, 1979-1984.


--Glenda 15:28, October 2, 2006 (EDT)

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